Cervical Cancer Screening
(PAP tests) can save your life.

Ask your doctor or your doctor's secretary to book a PAP test

Did you know?

Nearly 9 in 10 cases of Cervical Cancer can be prevented with regular PAP tests and follow-up on any abnormal results.
Get tested every 3 years
or as recommended by your doctor.

The Abbotsford Division of Family Practice encourages all women eligible to have a PAP test to get screened regularly.

The information on this webpage is brought to you by the Division's Increasing Cervical Cancer Screening project.

What Causes Cervical Cancer?

Cancer of the cervix is caused by a virus that can be transmitted during sexual intimacy. There is a vaccination program available. Talk to your doctor or your doctor's secretary about this.

Did you know?

Cervical Cancer is the second most common
female cancer in women less than
50 years of age.
Talk to your doctor or your doctor’s
secretary about cervical cancer screening
or a PAP test.

What is Cervical Cancer Screening
or a PAP test?

Cervical Cancer Screening (PAP test) is a test that can find abnormal cells in the cervix before they become cancer.

Who should have a PAP test?

Women between the ages of 25-69 years old.

  • Screening should start at age 25.
  • Women with normal PAPs between the ages of 25 and 69 should be screened every three years.
  • Screening can stop at age 69 if results have always been normal. Ask your doctor if you should still be tested.

You should still screen regularly for cervical cancer if:

  • You’ve been through menopause.
  • You’ve had one or more sexual partners, or have been with the same partner for a while.

An abnormal PAP test result does not necessarily mean that you have cancer. However, it is very important to attend all follow-up appointments.

Screening is effective! Cervical Cancer Screening has resulted in decreased Cervical Cancer incidents and deaths.

How does the PAP test help me?

Early Detection

PAP tests can find abnormal cervical cells so that they can be treated before they turn into cancer. If Cervical Cancer is caught at its earliest stage, the chance of survival is more than 85%.

Prevention

Nearly 9 in 10 cases of Cervical Cancer can be prevented with regular PAP tests and follow-up on any abnormal results.

Regular Screening

Screening can identify cancer at an early stage before it can cause symptoms. By having a PAP test every three years, you can reduce your risk of developing cervical cancer by up to 70%.

Peace
of mind

Regular PAP tests and any necessary follow-up will provide you with answers and results to support your health and well-being.

How is a PAP test done?

An instrument called a speculum is gently inserted in the vagina in order for the doctor or another health care provider, such as a nurse practitioner, nurse, or a registered midwife, to see your cervix. The health care provider will then collect some cells from your cervix using a small brush. Click the video below to watch the BC Cancer PAP Test cartoon video. This webpage has a link to the video in English and in Punjabi.

Video in English

Video in Punjabi

Cervical Cancer Signs
and Symptoms:

Cervical Cancer usually has no symptoms. Symptoms of cervical cancer may include:

  • A change in your vaginal discharge.
  • Pelvic pain or pain during sexual intercourse.
  • Abnormal vaginal bleeding, especially after intercourse.

If you experience any of these symptoms, see your doctor. Detecting and treating abnormal cells can stop cancer from developing. By having a PAP test every three years, you can reduce your risk of developing cervical cancer by up to 70%.

Who should I talk to about booking a PAP test?

Speak with your doctor or the doctor’s secretary about cervical cancer screening options.

If you don't have a doctor, you can contact the following clinics, by clicking the Clinic Locator button, to book a PAP test:

Clinic Locator

Get tested every 3 years or as recommended by your doctor.

The Abbotsford Division of Family Practice has a system in place that supports women in Abbotsford to have PAP test options. Ask your doctor about Pap test options, including having your Pap test done by a female provider who speaks English and Punjabi.